www.bitcoin.name

Mueller found out that Trump paid Putin with bitcoin to rig the election

Mueller found out that Trump paid Putin with bitcoin to rig the election submitted by jstolfi to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

03-22 03:12 - 'Jack needs to fucking hang for election rigging' by /u/e333ttt removed from /r/Bitcoin within 86-96min

'''
Jack needs to fucking hang for election rigging
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: e333ttt
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Don't let the fact that Hillary Clinton lost a rigged election by a landslide distract you from the fact that... /r/The_Donald

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Don't let the fact that Hillary Clinton lost a rigged election by a landslide distract you from the fact that... /The_Donald submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards!

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards! submitted by kmeisthax to shittybattlestations [link] [comments]

NBC says Russians counterfeited money aka mined bitcoin to rig the election.

https://twitter.com/ed_hannan/status/1019747540282105856
how stupid does the lamestream fake news media think we are?
submitted by norrinsyra_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

NBC says Russians counterfeited money aka mined bitcoin to rig the election. /r/Bitcoin

NBC says Russians counterfeited money aka mined bitcoin to rig the election. /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

things to add to the game: (part 2)

bitlifesuggestions
first i want to start with saying thank you to the bitlife devs (and of course the bitlife reddit community) for taking my suggestions into consideration from my last post!
now here are some update ideas i’ve had since my last post:
business & stock market & finance update: - ability to open a business (ex: clothing, record label, restaurant, tech company, etc.) - hire and manage employees (ex1: pay the job recruiter to recruit people to hire) (ex2: be able to give a raise, fire, or give more/less hours for your employees) - keep your business profitable with new products (ex: new menu item for restaurants, new clothing line, etc) - open new locations for your business - build an HQ - rig elections for the candidate that will make your business more profitable - invest in businesses - buy out businesses - open up your business to the stock market - invest in stocks - invest in bitcoin - open up a credit card savings account
new fame update: - hire a manager - new fame options depending on the job (ex1: pop star- release singles & albums, perform and go on tour, music charts, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) (ex2: movie star- audition for movies and tv shows [tv shows can last years depending on reviews], reviews on your work, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) (ex3: famous writer- release a book series, do book signings, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) - do club appearances - hangout with other celebrities - start beef with other celebrities - release merch
a new crime update: - print money - sell drugs - do drugs - join a gang - crime related jobs (ex: scammer, hitman, hacker) - commit arson - terrorism - become a famous drug lord
god mode updates: - another free trial with new god mode update - be able to change people’s career - be able to get people into a relationship and have babies (because it’s annoying that your kids/siblings rarely have kids) - edit the relationship status bar - edit yourself?
miscellaneous updates: - move in with boyfriend/girlfriend - collab with other influencers on social media - add twitch as a new social media and become a famous gamer (gamer as a new career) - add sudoku mini-game in the mind and body tab - vote in elections - mental disabilities (ex: adhd, ocd, etc) and be able to get medicated for it - be able to donate to charity (famous or not) - date multiple people at once
suggestions from other users that i like: - join a band (may or may not get you famous) and once you gain a bit of fame record labels could contact you [idea from u/lemonishfox] - ability to arrange marriage for your kids [idea from u/My_Existance] - god mode for pets [idea from u/ExpressSofaBread880]
thank you for reading through this post!! please feel free to add anything else or even add ideas to my ideas and expand the in the comments :)
submitted by divinepx to BitLifeApp [link] [comments]

How the US Elections Have and Will Impact the Price of Bitcoin

What Happened to the Price of Bitcoin in 2012 and 2016?

Presidential elections in the United States happen every four years — and it's interesting to note that they follow the same cycle as Bitcoin halving events.
‍Let's begin by taking a look at how Bitcoin fared in the past two U.S. elections. Back in 2012, when the crypto assets space was immature and in a very nascent phase, BTC was fairly muted when Barack Obama secured a second term, and stubbornly hovered around the $10.90 mark. Fast forward to November 2013, one year on from his re-election, and Bitcoin had surged by 2,221% to hit $253. However, it would be foolish to suggest that Obama had anything to do with this.
President Donald Trump's arrival in 2016 was much more interesting. When the result was first confirmed, Bitcoin shot up by 3.8% — from $709 to $736. Back then, the short-term surge was linked to the fact that Trump's victory took the stock market by surprise — and created uncertainty and volatility internationally. This resulted in demand for safe haven assets, and Bitcoin is regarded as one of them.
Shortly before the result was announced, crypto hedge fund manager Jacob Eliosoff had told Coindesk: "[If Trump wins] it would be an epic disaster in a bunch of respects — economic, geopolitical, democratic — and in the fear and chaos Bitcoin would be a defensive asset people could turn to."

How Will the U.S. Election in 2020 Affect Bitcoin?

The million-dollar (ahem, the 100 BTC) question is how digital currencies will react to the result this time. This presidential election is unusual for the markets because of how the coronavirus pandemic is dominating the news cycle. COVID could also end up affecting the speed of the result because of the volume of mail-in ballots.
It's highly possible that Bitcoin could remain fairly muted throughout the election if the result is clear. But here's a disclaimer: the outcome is shaping to be anything but.
Normally, the result is called by U.S. news networks in the early hours of the morning that follows the vote. But some experts are warning that ballots could take days or weeks to process this time around. All of this would create uncertainty for the U.S. dollar and the stock market, and this could contribute to a surge in demand for the likes of Bitcoin and Ethereum.
Donald Trump has also suggested that he may challenge the result of the upcoming U.S. election if he believes it is rigged. This would also spook the stock market, and again would work in the favor of cryptocurrencies and precious metals.
As you can see, the overarching theme here is certainty. Digital assets are unlikely to move much if there's a clear result and a peaceful transition of power — but expect turbulence if things start to get messy in Washington.
It is important to stress that not everyone agrees with this idea. Recent Bitcoin news has cast doubt on whether the cryptocurrency is the safe haven asset that everyone says it is — and some analysts argue that BTC is more closely correlated to the stock market than we think. In this scenario, we could see Bitcoin move in step with equities as they digest the news. Although Wall Street thinks a Trump win is unlikely, a second term for the Republicans is regarded as the preferable option in financial terms because of how Trump favors tax cuts.
‍Irrespective of who wins, there's going to be no shortage of crypto news...and there are so many questions to answer. Will the Fed finally start looking into CBDCs in a meaningful way? Will a stimulus package be approved? Are interest rates going to go negative? Will the USD weaken? Will Bitcoin return to its all-time high of $20,000 and embark on a new bull run? The rollercoaster ride for cryptocurrencies is far from over.
https://coinmarketcap.com/alexandria/article/how-us-election-could-influence-bitcoin-prices
submitted by airseasky to CoinMarketCap [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards! - Buttcoin - The P2P cyrpto-currency for butts. (link x-posted from /r/shittybattlestations )

Bitcoin mining rigs: fire AND electical hazards! - Buttcoin - The P2P cyrpto-currency for butts. (link x-posted from /shittybattlestations ) submitted by I-baLL to Cyberpunk [link] [comments]

America's Cardroom/Black Chip Poker (WPN skins) (Offshore, Up to 200%/$2000 bonus)

US/Offshore: Offshore
Deposit Method: Credit Card, Bitcoin, Other Crypto
Offer: 100% match up to $1000 for first deposit using credit card, 200% match up to $2000 for first deposit using cryptocurrency
Rolloveother requirements: Unlocks slowly through poker play only. Does not unlock bonus through casino or sports play
Overall Review: 3/5
Pros: Best poker site options for the US, with the highest guarantees and player pool, the sportsbook is kind of an afterthought for them, but it does offer some unique lines and props that other mainstream books don't offer (i.e. 2020 Senate election props), solid customer support for being an offshore book, and withdraws to crypto wallets in a day or two.
Cons: The large deposit match is tough to get through unless you are a solid poker player that grinds through multi-table play. Just like with any book, I would recommend to stay away from the casino and slots, they are the rigged for the site, especially so with ACBCP because they do not contribute to any rake-back/rollover requirements.
BlackChip Referral Link: Link
Please feel free to post your reviews and referral links below as well.
submitted by ThaddeusCastle to SportsbookReferrals [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: How prevalent is election rigging and voter fraud in the United States? /r/PoliticalDiscussion

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: How prevalent is election rigging and voter fraud in the United States? /PoliticalDiscussion submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Rigging the Election - Video IV: $20K Wire Transfer From Belize Returned /r/Anarcho_Capitalism

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Rigging the Election - Video IV: $20K Wire Transfer From Belize Returned /Anarcho_Capitalism submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

things to add to the game: (part. 2)

first i want to start with saying thank you to the bitlife devs (and of course the bitlife reddit community) for taking my suggestions into consideration from my last post!
now here are some update ideas i’ve had since my last post:
business & stock market & finance update: - ability to open a business (ex: clothing, record label, restaurant, tech company, etc.) - hire and manage employees (ex1: pay the job recruiter to recruit people to hire) (ex2: be able to give a raise, fire, or give more/less hours for your employees) - keep your business profitable with new products (ex: new menu item for restaurants, new clothing line, etc) - open new locations for your business - build an HQ - rig elections for the candidate that will make your business more profitable - invest in businesses - buy out businesses - open up your business to the stock market - invest in stocks - invest in bitcoin - open up a credit card savings account
new fame update: - hire a manager - new fame options depending on the job (ex1: pop star- release singles & albums, perform and go on tour, music charts, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) (ex2: movie star- audition for movies and tv shows [tv shows can last years depending on reviews], reviews on your work, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) (ex3: famous writer- release a book series, do book signings, award ceremony every 4 or 5 years) - do club appearances - hangout with other celebrities - start beef with other celebrities - release merch
a new crime update: - print money - sell drugs - do drugs - join a gang - crime related jobs (ex: scammer, hitman, hacker) - commit arson - terrorism - become a famous drug lord
god mode updates: - another free trial with new god mode update - be able to change people’s career - be able to get people into a relationship and have babies (because it’s annoying that your kids/siblings rarely have kids) - edit the relationship status bar - edit yourself?
miscellaneous updates: - move in with boyfriend/girlfriend - collab with other influencers on social media - add twitch as a new social media and become a famous gamer (gamer as a new career) - add sudoku mini-game in the mind and body tab - vote in elections - mental disabilities (ex: adhd, ocd, etc) and be able to get medicated for it - be able to donate to charity (famous or not) - date multiple people at once
suggestions from other users that i like: - join a band (may or may not get you famous) and once you gain a bit of fame record labels could contact you [idea from u/lemonishfox] - ability to arrange marriage for your kids [idea from u/My_Existance] - god mode for pets [idea from u/ExpressSofaBread880]
thank you for reading through this post!! please feel free to add anything else or even add ideas to my ideas and expand the in the comments :)
submitted by divinepx to bitlifesuggestions [link] [comments]

[SECRET]Supporters of Internet Media Personalities (SIMP)

Supporters of Internet Media Personalities

Throughout the vast internet, a group of certain individuals have begun to coalesce.
These individuals are connected by two factors: 1) their extreme support for Internet Media Personalities, such as e-girls and OnlyFans thots, and 2) Their vast IT knowledge of IT and skill. Often outcasts in the real world, the internet had become a safe haven for them, with their Internet Media Personalities of choice acting as para-social friends.
However, their cyber skills and lack of social capabilities would be their downfall from conventional social media. In their quest for recognition from e-girls (and guys) of choice, they would be banned one by one. Some were banned for relatively harmless stunts, such as getting their streamer of choice to the front page using botnets to inflate viewcounts. Many were banned for dangerous crimes, such as complex social engineering to stalk their idols. And small group attempted the downright insane. One man almost succeeded in rigging the Lacuyan (formerly Bahamas) elections to have Pokimane become its president, whilst another cracked $12 million worth of lost bitcoin accounts and attempted to donate it to CallMeCarson (the donation ended up confiscated).
Despite the varying levels of success, over time they were banned from all meaningful social media. Essentially, they become cyber-refugees in what was once their safe-haven.
Eventually, some of these like-minded individuals were destined to cross their paths while roaming aimlessly to through the internet. Using their knowledge of computers, they would manage to set up their own "social media". Completely of the radar, except to those with a lot of time and skill. In otherwise, the perfect spot for these individuals with ample supplies of both to meet one another.
It was here that a coalition was born: the Supporters of Internet Media Personalities. They solemnly vowed to set aside their differences in e-girl preference, in order to benefit all e-girls. They would continue to support m'lady from shadows, tragically hoping to one day bask in the light of preferred Internet Media Personality.
submitted by JarOfKetchup to worldpowers [link] [comments]

FEC.gov website doxes me for my $1 donation but elites can use dark fiat money groups to donate millions anonymously. But Bitcoin Bad!

A while back, I had donated $1 to a democrat, to keep their anti-war voice on the DNC debate stage.
I was under the (wrongful) impression that small donations were anonymous.
Nope, my name, employer, city, state, zip code, & donation are listed on the FEC.gov website.
https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/
Meanwhile, elites can donate millions anonymously through dark money groups.
Dark money In the politics of the United States, dark money refers to political spending by nonprofit organizations — for example, 501(c)(4) (social welfare) 501(c)(5) (unions) and 501(c)(6) (trade association) groups — that are not required to disclose their donors.[3][4] Such organizations can receive unlimited donations from corporations, individuals and unions. In this way, their donors can spend funds to influence elections, without voters knowing where the money came from. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_money
Seems like a rigged game, especially when individuals can be attacked or fired for their political beliefs.

But don't invest in Bitcoin, cause some poor criminals used it! /s
submitted by Malkavius2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Do I sound more like a Democrat or Republican?

Here are my positions -
  1. Should the federal government institute a mandatory buyback of assault weapons? No
  2. Should a business be able to deny service to a customer if the request conflicts with the owner’s religious beliefs? If they are not engaged in interstate commerce, the Federal Government shouldn't hold any power to legislate on the matter. At the state level (and federal if interstate) Yes, so long as they are not discriminating on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation, transgender, or other uncontrollable factors.
  3. Should the government continue to fund Planned Parenthood? Yes, with oversight to make sure the money is going o where it is supposed to.
  4. Should universities provide “trigger warnings” and “safe spaces” for students? No
  5. Do you support the death penalty? Generally no, with the possible exception of treason during an insurrection or invasion.
  6. Should the government support a separation of church and state by removing references to God on money, federal buildings, and national monuments? No, this is referring to God as a concept.
  7. Should businesses be required to have women on their board of directors? No
  8. Do you support the legalization of same sex marriage? Yes, through a constitutional amendment. At the state level, yes.
  9. Should the military allow women to serve in combat roles? Yes as long as they meet the same physical standards as men and pass the same tests.
  10. Should marital rape be classified and punished as severely as non-marital rape? This should be a state-level issue, but yes.
  11. Should terminally ill patients be allowed to end their lives via assisted suicide? Only if there is no chance of survival.
  12. Should hate speech be protected by the first amendment? It is, and yes.
  13. Should gay couples have the same adoption rights as straight couples? Yes
  14. Should states be allowed to display the Confederate flag on government property? They have the right, but I would prefer my state not.
  15. Should women be allowed to wear a Niqāb, or face veil, to civic ceremonies? I am not fully certain. I am leaning towards yes, as long as another woman has verified her identity.
  16. Should welfare recipients be tested for drugs? Only if they have a criminal history related to drug abuse.
  17. Should employers be required to pay men and women the same salary for the same job? This shouldn't be a federal issue unless it involves interstate commerce. But at the state-level (and federal if interstate), Yes if they work the same positions and for the same hours and conditions.
  18. Should there be fewer or more restrictions on current welfare benefits? More, reform it so it supplements, rather than replaces, an income.
  19. Should the government raise the federal minimum wage? The federal government should not have the power to enact minimum wage laws unless it involves interstate commerce, in which case yes, it should be $15 an hour. Each state should be able to set its own laws on the matter.
  20. Should the government make cuts to public spending in order to reduce the national debt? No.
  21. Should the U.S. increase tariffs on imported products from China? Yes, China should be punished for violations of international law.
  22. Should businesses be required to provide paid leave for full-time employees during the birth of a child or sick family member? At the state-level, yes. At the federal level, yes, if they are involved in interstate commerce.
  23. Should the government increase the tax rate on profits earned from the sale of stocks, bonds, and real estate? Capital gains should be taxed the same as ordinary income.
  24. Should the current estate tax rate be decreased? No, I am satisfied with the current system.
  25. Should the U.S. continue to participate in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)? No.
  26. Should the President offer tax breaks to individual companies to keep jobs in the U.S.? No, but put tariffs on all imported goods.
  27. Should the government prevent “mega mergers” of corporations that could potentially control a large percentage of market share within its industry? No.
  28. Do you believe labor unions help or hurt the economy? Help, in theory, but are sometimes harmful.
  29. Should the government break up Amazon, Facebook and Google? No.
  30. Should the government add or increase tariffs on products imported into the country? Yes, all imported goods should be taxed 20%.
  31. Should the U.S. raise or lower the tax rate for corporations? Keep at current rate, but close all loopholes.
  32. Should the government require businesses to pay salaried employees, making up to $46k/year, time-and-a-half for overtime hours? At the state level, yes. At the federal level, only if they are involved in interstate commerce.
  33. Do you support the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)? No.
  34. Would you favor an increased sales tax in order to reduce property taxes? No.
  35. Should pension plans for federal, state, and local government workers be transitioned into privately managed accounts? No.
  36. Should the government subsidize farmers? For now, yes, but once we get out of trade deals, put tariffs on all imports, and tax all interstate sales, subsidies should be ended.
  37. Should the government use economic stimulus to aid the country during times of recession? No, recessions are natural cycles.
  38. Should the Federal Reserve Bank be audited by Congress? Yes, we should know where that money is going.
  39. Should the IRS create a free electronic tax filing system? Yes.
  40. Should an in-state sales tax apply to online purchases of in-state buyers from out-of-state sellers? No, the federal government should not enact an intrastate sales tax.
  41. Should pension payments be increased for retired government workers? Yes, adjust them yearly for inflation.
  42. Should U.S. citizens be allowed to save or invest their money in offshore bank accounts? Yes, as long as all income is reported.
  43. Should the government classify Bitcoin as a legal currency? Yes, but maintain the system of the dollar and cash as a legal currency.
  44. Should the government acquire equity stakes in companies it bails out during a recession? No.
  45. Do you support charter schools? No.
  46. Should the government decriminalize school truancy? No for Elementary school. For middle and high school, no social studies and English, yes for everything else.
  47. Should there be more restrictions on the current process of purchasing a gun? States and the federal government should not be allowed to enact any restrictions on black powder weapons or ammunition for them. For cartridge firearms, the federal government should only have the power to regulate interstate sale of them. At the state level, cartridge firearms should require a license to obtain. The process should involve passing a mental and physical health exam, having a decent criminal record, and passing a written and shooting exam. Handguns and centerfire semi-automatic weapons should have higher standards for licensing and should be registered before being obtained, but automatic CCW to anyone who has a license for a handgun. fully automatic weapons should be illegal to sell, except to collectors, who must meet an even higher standard to obtain.
  48. Should victims of gun violence be allowed to sue firearms dealers and manufacturers? No, this is just dumb.
  49. Should the President of the United States have the power to deploy military troops in order to stop protests? If any state governments are overthrown, yes. Otherwise, only if the Governor of a state requests assistance.
  50. Should teachers be allowed to carry guns at school? Yes if they have a valid license 9see above).
  51. Should it be illegal to burn the American flag? No, but I have no respect for anyone who does.
  52. Should the state government order schools to provide online only classes in order to combat coronavirus? No, let each school decide.
  53. Should there be term limits set for members of Congress? Yes, maximum four terms for the House, and maximum two for the Senate.
  54. Should people on the “no-fly list” be banned from purchasing guns and ammunition? No, this denies one of due process rights.
  55. Are you in favor of decriminalizing drug use? Yes, for most but not all drugs (basically the really bad ones, e.g., meth, heroin, etc;)
  56. Should the NSA (National Security Agency) be allowed to collect basic metadata of citizen’s phone calls such as numbers, timestamps, and call durations? Only with a warrant and probable cause of a crime.
  57. Should the Supreme Court be reformed to include more seats and term limits on judges? No, this is just trying to pack the court, which should not be politicized.
  58. Should the government regulate social media sites, as a means to prevent fake news and misinformation? No, this violates free speech.
  59. Do you support the Patriot Act? Not the clause that allows warrantless searches.
  60. Should the government be allowed to seize private property, with reasonable compensation, for public or civic use? Only for public land and not for privatization, and the owner must be paid for losses in full.
  61. Should college sports be played in the fall of 2020? Yes, but let teams decide.
  62. Should local police increase surveillance and patrol of Muslim neighborhoods? No, this just breeds resentment.
  63. Should the government raise the retirement age for Social Security? No
  64. Should the government pass laws which protect whistleblowers? Yes, so long as national security isn't compromised.
  65. Should the redrawing of Congressional districts be controlled by an independent, non-partisan commission? Yes, gerrymandering breeds corruption.
  66. Should internet service providers be allowed to speed up access to popular websites (that pay higher rates) at the expense of slowing down access to less popular websites (that pay lower rates)? If they are privately owned, yes.
  67. Should the U.S. government grant immunity to Edward Snowden? For his leaks on domestic surveillance, yes. Some other things, maybe not.
  68. Should foreign terrorism suspects be given constitutional rights? Yes.
  69. Do you support the killing of Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani? Yes.
  70. Should the U.S. continue to support Israel? Yes.
  71. Should the U.S. accept refugees from Syria? Yes, but only after extensive background checks to confirm that they are not a threat and are genuine refugees and not economic migrants.
  72. Should the government increase or decrease military spending? Decrease by streamlining it, and making it more efficient, through eliminating wasteful spending.
  73. Should the military fly drones over foreign countries to gain intelligence and kill suspected terrorists? No, unless said country has approved it, and American citizens should be given fair trials.
  74. Should the military be allowed to use enhanced interrogation techniques, such as waterboarding, to gain information from suspected terrorists? No.
  75. Should every 18 year old citizen be required to provide at least one year of military service? No, but maintain the Selective Service system and allow states to draft people if necessary.
  76. Should Jerusalem be recognized as the capital of Israel? Yes.
  77. Should the U.S. go to war with Iran? No, they should be disarmed through diplomatic channels.
  78. Should the U.S. remain in the United Nations? Yes.
  79. Should the U.S. remain in NATO? Yes.
  80. Should the U.S. defend other NATO countries that maintain low military defense budgets relative to their GDP? Yes, but get them to pay their share.
  81. Should the United States pull all military troops out of Afghanistan? If the Afghan government wants us to, then yes.
  82. Should the U.S. sell military weapons to India in order to counter Chinese and Russian influence? Yes.
  83. Should the U.S. conduct military strikes against North Korea in order to destroy their long-range missile and nuclear weapons capabilities? No, use all diplomatic means first.
  84. Do you support President Obama’s move to lift the trade and travel embargo on Cuba? Yes.
  85. Should it be illegal to join a boycott of Israel? No.
  86. Should the government cancel production of the F-35 fighter? Yes, until the price has been lowered or our deficits have been drastically reduced, and its hardware is drastically improved.
  87. Do you support the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare)? No.
  88. Should people be required to work in order to receive Medicaid? No.
  89. Should cities open drug “safe havens” where people who are addicted to illegal drugs can use them under the supervision of medical professionals? Yes.
  90. Do you support the legalization of Marijuana? The federal government should not have the power to ban marijuana, except to regulate or ban its interstate sale, which it shouldn't at the state level, legalize.
  91. Should the government regulate the prices of life-saving drugs? No.
  92. Should health insurers be allowed to deny coverage to individuals who have a pre-existing condition? At the federal level, no, if they are operating in interstate commerce. At the state level, no.
  93. Should there be more or less privatization of veterans’ healthcare? Less, improve the current system.
  94. Should the federal government increase funding of health care for low income individuals (Medicaid)? Yes.
  95. Should the federal government be allowed to negotiate drug prices for Medicare? Yes.
  96. Should the government fund the World Health Organization? Yes.
  97. Should the government increase environmental regulations to prevent climate change? No.
  98. Should researchers be allowed to use animals in testing the safety of drugs, vaccines, medical devices, and cosmetics? Yes, but not for cosmetics.
  99. Should the U.S. expand offshore oil drilling? No, but maintain current rigs.
  100. Do you support the use of hydraulic fracking to extract oil and natural gas resources? Allow it to be legal, but don't subsidize.
  101. Should the government stop construction of the Dakota Access pipeline? No.
  102. Should disposable products (such as plastic cups, plates, and cutlery) that contain less than 50% of biodegradable material be banned? No.
  103. Should drilling be allowed in the Alaska Wildlife Refuge? No.
  104. Should cities be allowed to offer private companies economic incentives to relocate? Yes.
  105. Should the government give tax credits and subsidies to the wind power industry? No, no industry should be favored.
  106. Should the government require children to be vaccinated for preventable diseases? No.
  107. Do you support the use of nuclear energy? Yes, lessen restrictions, but no subsidies.
  108. Should producers be required to label genetically engineered foods (GMOs)? Yes.
  109. Should illegal immigrants have access to government-subsidized healthcare? No.
  110. Should immigrants be deported if they commit a serious crime? Yes, after serving their sentence.
  111. Should illegal immigrants be offered in-state tuition rates at public colleges within their residing state? No.
  112. Should the U.S. build a wall along the southern border? No, but make a high tech surveillance barrier instead of a physical wall. This is because a physical wall would be too costly and ineffective.
  113. Should local law enforcement be allowed to detain illegal immigrants for minor crimes and transfer them to federal immigration authorities? Yes.
  114. Should sanctuary cities receive federal funding? No.
  115. Should the U.S. increase restrictions on its current border security policy? Yes.
  116. Should immigrants be required to pass a citizenship test to demonstrate a basic understanding of our country’s language, history, and government? Yes.
  117. Should children of illegal immigrants be granted legal citizenship? Yes, if they were born here.
  118. Should Muslim immigrants be banned from entering the country until the government improves its ability to screen out potential terrorists? No.
  119. Should immigrants be required to learn English? Yes, if they wish to become citizens.
  120. Should there be a temporary ban on all immigration into the United States? No, but increase border security.
  121. Should the US increase or decrease the amount of temporary work visas given to high-skilled immigrant workers? Increase, our economy relies on businesses hiring the highest skilled workers at the lowest cost.
  122. Should working illegal immigrants be given temporary amnesty? No.
  123. Should immigrants to the United States be allowed to hold dual citizenship status? Yes.
  124. Do you support Common Core national standards? Yes, but only for English and social studies.
  125. Should a photo ID be required to vote? No, but gradually update voter rolls and purge voters who are required to be according tot eh Voting Registration act of 1993.
  126. Should foreigners, currently residing in the United States, have the right to vote? No, only citizens should.
  127. Should the minimum voting age be lowered? No.
  128. Should the electoral college be abolished? No.
  129. Should the US have a mail-in ballot process for whole states in local, state, and federal elections? No.
  130. Should foreign lobbyists be allowed to raise money for American elections? No.
  131. Should there be a limit to the amount of money a candidate can receive from a donor? No.
  132. Should corporations, unions, and non-profit organizations be allowed to donate to political parties? No.
  133. Should there be a 5-year ban on White House and Congressional officials from becoming lobbyists after they leave the government? No.
  134. Should political candidates be required to release their recent tax returns to the public? No.
  135. Should funding for local police departments be redirected to social and community based programs? No, increase funding and training for police departments in higher crime rate communities
  136. Should police officers be required to wear body cameras? Yes.
  137. Should convicted criminals have the right to vote? Yes, but only after completing their sentence and probation.
  138. Should drug traffickers receive the death penalty? No.
  139. Should non-violent prisoners be released from jail in order to reduce overcrowding? Yes, but have them do community service.
  140. Do you support mandatory minimum prison sentences for people charged with drug possession? No.
  141. Should the government hire private companies to run prisons? No.
  142. Should prisons ban the use of solitary confinement for juveniles? No, but it is currently being overused
  143. Should the US assassinate suspected terrorists in foreign countries? No, capture, interrogate, and imprison them instead
  144. What is your position on Abortion? Adopt a constitutional amendment overturning Roe v Wade and allow state to enact their own laws. At the state level, abortion should be legal within the first 20 weeks, but afterwards, should be banned except for exceptional cases.
  145. Do you support affirmative action? No.
submitted by Maximum-Lingonberry2 to NoStupidQuestions [link] [comments]

How to dive deep into political theory and philosophy: The Bread List

This is a curated collection of (largely) contemporary thinkers, books and video content aimed as a reference for questions like -
"What should I read next?", "Who should I follow?" or "What are the best resources for [certain political topic]?"
The core list comes from Noam Chomsky, and the books and people he's cited or praised. But the list has significantly expanded since then. Feel free to comment about any good books or channels you think should be on this list.
BreadTube discord here: https://discord.gg/ynn9rHE
Journalists
Start off with:
Adam H Johnson - Propaganda Model, Media Critique at FAIR
Nathan J Robinson - Journalist, Current Affairs
Glenn Greenwald- Journalist, Privacy, US imperialism. The Intercept
Also Great
Owen Jones- UK Journalist
Naomi Klein- Journalist, neoliberalism, globalization.
George Monbiot- Journalist, environmentalist.
Amy Goodman- Journalist Democracy Now
Alex Press - Journalist and Founder, Jacobin
Alexander Cockburn - Journalist
Chris Hedges- Journalist.
P Sainath- Journalist, India specialist
Whistleblowing:
Daniel Ellsberg- Vietnam, Released Pentagon Papers.
Edward Snowden
Chelsea Manning
Julian Assange
US History and Foreign Policy
Start off with:
Noam Chomsky - Everything
Howard Zinn- Historian
Laura Poitras - Documentary maker
Also Great
Eqbal Ahmad, - US imperialism
Michelle Alexander, US prison system
William Blum- Former State Dept. Agent, Historian, US imperialism
Jean Bricmont- “The Belgian Chomsky” – US imperialism, geopolitics,
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz - US History
Thomas Ferguson- US elections specialist.
Ian Haney Lopez- Racism, US politics.
Deepa Kumar- US imperialism, Islamophobia.
Andrew Bacevich - U.S. foreign policy, historian
Economics
Start off with:
Thomas Piketty - inequality
Ha-Joon Chang - institutional economist, specialising in development economics:
Joseph Stiglitz - Former World Bank Chief Economist
Amartya Sen- Third world development and Inequality, Nobel Prize Winner
Yanis Varoufakis
Richard Wolff- Marxism
Dean Baker
Also Great
Michael Albert
John Bellamy Foster
Richard Wilkinson- inequality
William Krehm - Labour
Stephanie Kelton - Modern Monetary Theory
Historians
Start off with:
Thomas Frank - historian, American politics
Howard Zinn- "People's" Historian
Raul Hilberg - The Leading Authority on the Holocaust
Phillip Mirowski - History of economics
Eric Hobsbawm - historian, Marxist
Also Great
Gar Aleprovitz, - world war 2, co-operatives.
Alex Carey - Laid the foundation for Manufacturing Consent
Nancy Maclean - US South, Labor, Race
Mark Curtis
Mike Davis- Globalization, Historian.
Gerald Horne- Historian, black liberation.
Gabriel Kolko- Historian. World War 2.
Morris Berman - historian, American social critic
Israel/Palestine
Start off with:
Norman Finkelstein- Israel specialist.
Avi Shlaim - Israel
Also Great
Amira Hass- Journalist, Israel specialist.
Illan Pappe- Israel specialist
James Petras- Israel and Latin America specialist.
Greg Philo- Media criticism, Israel.
Media Criticism
Start off with:
Edward Herman- Media criticism.
Robert McChesney- media criticism.
Edward Said- sociology, Islamophobia, Israel, media criticism
Also Great
Ben Bagdikian, - media criticism.
Keane Bhatt- Media Criticism, Latin America.
Oliver Boyd-Barrett- Media Criticism
Sut Jhally- sociology, film-maker
James Curran- Media Criticism
Alan MacLeod - Media Criticism, Venezuela
Anarchism/Socialism/Political Theory
Start off with:
David Graeber- historian, anarchism, Occupy Wall Street, anthropology.
Joel Bakan, - writer of “The Corporation”, seminal book on corporations.
Cornel West- sociology
Tariq Ali, “The British Chomsky”- everything from globalization to history to politics.
Murray Bookchin - Anarchism
Also Great
Angela Davis- Feminism, Marxism, black liberation.
Peter Gelderloos - anarchism
Uri Gordon - anarchism, Israel/Palestine
Harry Cleaver - Marxism, economics
Michel Bauwens - P2P, political economy
James C. Scott - anarchism, anthropology
Michael Heinrich - Marxism, political science
Specialists
Stephen Cohen- Russia specialist.
Bruce Cummings- Korea Specialist.
Aviva Chomsky – Immigration, Latin America.
Eduardo Galeano- Poet, Author, Latin American specialist.
Fawaz Gerges - Middle East specialist.
Andrej Grubacic- Yugoslavia specialist.
Flynt and Hillary Leverett- Iran specialists.
William I. Robinson- globalization, neoliberalism, Latin America specialist
Lars Schoultz- Latin America specialist
Sanho Tree- drugs, Colombia specialist
Nick Turse - Africa
Mark Weisbrot- economics, Latin America
Kevin Young- media criticism, Latin America
Raj Patel- Food
Vijay Prashad- globalization, third world development
Thomas Szasz- Criticism of psychiatry
Alfie Kohn- Education.
Daniel Kovalik - Human rights
Paulo Freire- Education.
Henry Giroux- Education
Greg Grandin - Historian, Latin America
Dave Zirin- sports
Gabor Maté- Education, drugs, psychiatry.
Kate Bronfenbrenner - Labour and Unions
Loic Wacquant - sociology, neoliberalism
Bernard Harcourt - surveillance, penal law
Eric Toussaint - political science, debt
The best arguments for major mainstream political positions:
Fascism and Neo-Conservatism
On Dictatorship and The Concept of The Political Carl Schmitt
Note:
Some have argued that neoconservativism has been influenced by Schmitt Most notably the legal opinions offered by Alberto Gonzales, John Yoo et al. by invoking the unitary executive theory to justify highly controversial policies in the war on terror—such as introducing unlawful combatant status which purportedly would eliminate protection by the Geneva Conventions torture, NSA electronic surveillance program—mimic his writings.Professor David Luban said in 2011 that "[a] Lexis search reveals five law review references to Schmitt between 1980 and 1990; 114 between 1990 and 2000; and 420 since 2000, with almost twice as many in the last five years as the previous five"
Realpolitik
World Order, by Henry Kissinger
Liberalism/Social Democracy
A Theory of Justice, by John Rawls
Right-Wing Libertarianism
Anarchy, State, Utopia by Robert Nozick
Technocracy
Zero to One, by Peter Thiel
Marxism-Leninism
Left-Wing Communism, and Infantile Disorder by Vladimir Lenin
Recommended books:
Israel/Palestine and the Middle East:
Start off with:
The Iron Wall by Avi Shlaim
★ Gaza: An Inquest Into Its Martyrdom by Norman Finkelstein
Also Great
★ Fateful Triangle by Noam Chomsky
Israel/Palestine: How to End the War of 1948 by Tanya Reinhart
The Birth of Israel: Myths and Realities by Simha Flapan
Between the Lines: Israel, the Palestinians, and the U.S. War on Terror by Tikva Honig-Parnass
The Holocaust Industry: Norman Finkelstein
Defending the Holy Land: A Critical Analysis of Israel's Security and Foreign Policy by Zeev Maoz
Gaza: An Inquest Into Its Martyrdom by Norman Finkelstein
The New Intifada: Resisting Israel’s Apartheid by Roane Carey, Alison Weir, and others
The Battle for Justice in Palestine by Ali Abunimah
American Foreign Policy:
Start off with:
★ ★ ★ Understanding Power by Noam Chomsky
Killing Hope: U.S. Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II by William Blum
Also Great:
Defeat: Why America and Britain Lost Iraq by Jonathon Steele
A Different Kind of War: The Un Sanctions Regime in Iraq by Hans. C. Von Sponeck
Al-Qaeda: Casting a Shadow of Terror by Jason Burke
How America Gets Away with Murder: Illegal Wars, Collateral Damage and Crimes Against Humanity by Michael Mandel
The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America's Wars by John Turnam
Talking to the Enemy: Faith, Brotherhood, and the (Un)Making of Terrorists by Scott Atran
The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade by Alfred W. McCoy
Ideal Illusions: How the U.S. Government Co-opted Human Rights by James Peck
War Stars: The Superweapon and the American Imagination by Howard Bruce Franklin
Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan by Nick Turse
Tomorrow's Battlefield : U.S. Proxy Wars and Secret Ops in Africa by Nick Turse
The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II by John Dower
Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety by Eric Schlosser
The Hungry World: America's Cold War Battle Against Poverty in Asia by Nick Cullather
Voices From the Other Side: An Oral History of Terrorism Against Cuba by Keith Bolender
The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner by Daniel Ellsberg
Tinderbox: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Roots of Terrorism by Stephen Zunes
One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War by Michael Dobbs
Kill Chain: Drones and The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins by Andrew Cockburn
First Do No Harm: Humanitarian Intervention and the Destruction of Yugoslavia by David Gibbs
The Management of Savagery by Max Blumenthal
Media and Propaganda:
Start off with:
Manufacturing Consent by Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky
Propaganda by Edward Bernays
The Record of the Paper: How the New York Times Misreports US Foreign Policy by Richard A. Falk
Also Great:
The Real Terror Network: Terrorism in Fact and Propaganda by Edward Herman
The Politics of Genocide by Edward Herman
Taking the Risk Out of Democracy: Corporate Propaganda versus Freedom and Liberty by Alex Carey
American History and Culture:
Start off with:
★ A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
Also Great:
Political Repression in Modern America: FROM 1870 TO 1976 by Robert Justin Goldstein
No is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein
The Industrial Worker, 1840-1860: The Reaction of American Industrial Society to the Advance of the Industrial Revolution by Norman Ware
Voices of a People's History of the United States by Anthony Arnove and Howard Zinn
Violent Politics: A History of Insurgency, Terrorism, and Guerrilla War, from the American Revolution to Iraq by William R. Polk
★ With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful by Glenn Greenwald
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right by Arlie Russell Hochschild
The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward Baptist
The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon
Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945 by Max Hastings
The Politics of War: Allied Diplomacy and the World Crisis of 1943-1945 by Gabriel Kolko Labor History:
The Fall of the House of Labor by David Montgomery
Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945-60 by Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf
The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 by Charles Grier Sellers
Sociopathic Society: A People’s Sociology of the United States by Charles Derber
On the Rojava Experiment:
Revolution in Rojava
Struggles for Autonomy in Kurdistan
A Small Key Can Open a Large Door
Rojava: An Alternative to Imperialism, Nationalism, and Islamism in the Middle East
Coming Down the Mountains
To Dare Imagining: Rojava Revolution
★ Ocalan’s Prison Writings
Anarchism, Socialism, Philosophy, and Science:
Start off with:
Government In The Future(Talk) by Noam Chomsky
Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell
On Anarchism by Mikhail Bakunin
The Limits of State Action by Wilhelm von Humboldt
Also Great
Progress Without People: In Defense of Luddism by David F. Noble
Granny Made Me an Anarchist: General Franco, The Angry Brigade and Me by Stuart Christie
Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals' Abuse of Science by Alan Sokal
Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture by Alan Sokal
A Theory of Power by Jeff Vail
Workers' Councils by Anton Pannekoek
The State: Its Origin and Function by William Paul
On Anarchism by Noam Chomsky
The Anarchist Collectives: Workers' Self-Management in the Spanish Revolution 1936-39 by Sam Dolgoff
Anarchism by Daniel Guerin
The Ancestors Tale by Richard Dawkins
Demon Haunted World by Carl Sagan
Memory and the Computational Brain: Why Cognitive Science WIll Transform Neuroscience by Randy Gallistel and Adam Philip King
Vision: A Computational Investigation Into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information by David Marr
Economics:
Start off with:
★ ★ Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism by Ha-Joon Chang
★ Making Globalization Work by Joseph Stiglitz
Capital in the 21st Century by Thomas Piketty
Adam Smith and His Legacy for Modern Capitalism by Patricia H. Werhane
Also Great:
Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism by Richard Wolff
Das Kapital by Karl Marx
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America by Martin Gilens
America Beyond Capitalism by Gar Alperovitz
The ABCs of Political Economy: A Modern Approach by Robert Hahnel
★ ★ Golden Rule: The Investment Theory of Party Competition and the Logic of Money-Driven Political Systems by Thomas Ferguson
The Conservative Nanny State: How the Wealthy Use the Government to Stay Rich and Get Richer by Dean Baker
Rigged: How Globalization and the Rules of the Modern Economy Were Structured to Make the Rich Richer by Dean Baker
Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age by Larry M. Bartels
Understanding Capitalism: Critical Analysis From Karl Marx to Amartya Sen by Douglas Down
Whose Crisis, Whose Future?: Towards a Greener, Fairer, Richer World by Susan George
Business as Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism by Paul Mattock Jr.
Greening the Global Economy by Robert Pollin
Capitalism: A Ghost Story by Arundhati Roy
Political Economy and Laissez Faire by Rajani Kannepalli Kanth
The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time by Karl Polanyi
Miscellaneous:
★ Discipline and Punish, by Michel Foucault
Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari
Controlling the Dangerous Classes by Randall G. Shelden
Pedagogy of the Opressed by Paulo Freire
The Verso Book of Dissent: From Spartacus to the Shoe-Thrower of Baghdad by Andrew Hsiao
Don't Mourn, Balkanize!: Essays After Yugoslavia by Andrej Grubačić
★ Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers by Arundhati Roy
Voices from the Plain of Jars: Life under an Air War by Fred Branfman
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
In Praise of Barbarians by Mike Davis
Damming the Flood by Peter Hallward
Hope and Folly: The United States and UNESCO, 1945-1985 by Edward Herman and Herbert Schiller
Fanshen: A Documentary of Revolution in a Chinese Village by William Hinton
The Egyptians: A Radical Story by Jack Shenker
Welcome to the Revolution: Universalizing Resistance for Social Justice and Democracy in Perilous Times by Charles Derber
Sociopathic Society: A People’s Sociology of the United States by Charles Derber
The Black Jacobins by C.L.R. James
Dark Money by Jane Meyers
King Leopold's Ghost by Adam Hochschild
Recommended YouTubers/Creators/Channels(with a linked video to get you started):
Political
Contrapoints | America: Still Racist
★ Philosophy Tube | The Philosophy of Antifa
Existential Comics
★ ★ Chomsky’s Philosophy | Bakunin's Predictions
HBomber Guy | Soy Boys: A Measured Response
Shaun | How Privatisation Fails: Railways
Badmouse Productions | Argument ad Venezuelum
Three Arrows | Who is actually at fault for the refugee crisis?
Gravesend Films (with Norman Finkelstein) | The Idea Of Utopia
The Intercept | Greenwald and Risen debate Russiagate
Non Political
Lindsay Ellis - Film Criticism | The Ideology of the First Order
The Great War - History | The Run For The Baku Oil Fields
History Civilis - History | The Constitution Of The Spartans
Numberphile - Mathematics | Perplexing Paperclips
Computerphile - Technology | The Bitcoin Power Problem
Vihart - Mathematics | Hexaflexagons
3Blue1Brown - Mathematics | How Cryptocurrencies Work
PBS SpaceTime - Astronomy, Physics | The Blackhole Information Paradox
Will Schoder - Video Essays | The Problem with Irony and Postmodernism
Assorted Documentaries to get you started:
Manufacturing Consent - The seminal work on how the population is controlled in democratic societies
★ ★ Citizenfour - Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras in a Hong Kong Room.
★ ★ Risk - A deep look at Wikileaks - from the inside the embassy.
The Murder of Fred Hampton - How the FBI brazenly assassinated an American citizen without any warrant or due process
Weiner - An incredible look at how political campaigns function from the inside.
The Corporation - What are corporations?
The Shock Doctrine - Lectures by Naomi Klein, news-reel footage and analysis to explain the connection between politics and economics.
Hypernormalization - Explains not only why chaotic events happen - but also why we, and politicians, cannot understand them.
Inside Job - A look at the cause for the financial crisis
Podcasts
Start off with:
★ ★ ★ Citations Needed
Also Great:
Intercepted
Current Affairs Podcast
Chapo Trap House
Moderate Rebels
Economic Update
Protect Yourself:
PrivacyToolsIO,
Electronic Frontier Foundation
submitted by -_-_-_-otalp-_-_-_- to BreadTube [link] [comments]

Want to know how why Venezuela has an interim president that is not Maduro?

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All funds transfered will be used to buy medicines and food for people in need Venezuela. Please, donate. https://www.paypal.me/sorckas Bitcoin 1JdBWtt995mHH7uYbPjZJNDeh1KxvFMYgB Ethereum 0x5535EEeF023499419f965dc9336A6F339298dC24 Bitcoin Cash qp0r0akjaxfddqzlmskjlu0gq5ydweh0judwhpqn9n
Many people argue that Juan Guaidó is not the president of the republic, or that there's a coup d'etat in Venezuela. Other argue that the legitime president of Venezuela is Nicolas Maduro because he won elections, and therefore he should be president. There are so many people who want to know the true but they simply find biased information provided by government-funded agents such as TelesurTV that have clearly a bad reputation when it comes to report the venezuelan humanitarian crisis, the constitutional crisis, and every other aspect that you may find necessary to really understand what is going on Venezuela. To understand how we are here, we must learn about past events like designation of judges to the Supreme Court, derogation of the presidential referendum, dissolution of the parliament, a new designation of judges to the Supreme Court, and other things that I will try to put down in an effort to let people know what actually happened since 2013 to 2019.

First of all. How did Maduro came to presidency?

He was named vicepresident by Chavez, then Chavez died in 2013 which leaves Maduro as the interim president until new elections were convened in april of 2013, which Maduro claims he won, but the opposition contested and called to count the ballots something that the electoral body never does unless it is asked because the results are always issued electronically. The electoral body (put in there by the socialist party) didn't accept the petition to count the ballots.

2015 parliament elections

After the electoral body didn't accept to count the ballots, the discontent against the regime grew among the population, allowing the opposition to keep winning popular support. On December 6 of 2015 parliament elections were hold. The opposition won with 56% of the votes, something that many people didn't expect. The opposition obtained 2/3 of the seats in the parliament.
Both Maduro and the opposition recognized the results as the electoral body claimed that there were not any irregularities

13 new judges illegaly named

On December 22, 2015, the incumbent parliament members who were elected back in 2010 illegaly named 13 new judges to the Supreme Court, something that should have happened not in 2015 but in 2016. The vast majority of these new judges were parliament members the same day they were appointed to the Supreme Court. They even were the ones who proposed in the parliament to name new judges, and of course, they were members of the socialist party. The parliament back then was still controlled by the socialist party.

The Supreme Court declares null the election of deputies elected in December 6 of 2015

One of the socialist deputies who was illegaly named judge to the Supreme Court in December 22th of 2015, declared null the election of several opposition deputies in Amazonas state. This caused the opposition to lose the 2/3 of the parliament that it obtained after winning the election of December 6.

166 deputies sworn in to the parliament, including Amazonas' deputies

On January 6 of 2016, 112 opposition deputies were sworn in to the parliament, including those who were elected in the Amazonas whose election was contested

The Supreme Court outlaws the parliament

After the opposition-held parliament decided to sworn in three deputies who were elected in the contested Amazonas circuit, the supreme court decided, at petition of one parliament member of the socialist party, to outlaw the entire parliament alleging they disobey the orders to not swear in the Amazonas' deputies.

The opposition calls for a presidential referendum

According to the venezuelan constitution, you can recall any elected official after having completed half of the term for which the official was elected. This was the case for Maduro's presidential term which was at its half in April of 2016. The opposition wanted to recall and started the process to do so in April of 2016, but first, according to the constitution, they needed to follow a procediment to collect signatures which must be verified by the electoral body. The opposition needed only 300,000 signatures, they instead collected 2,1 millions of signatures
The opposition parties did call for the presidential recall, not the parliament. Just for clarification.

Electoral body cancels the presidential recall

Because of 10,000 suspicious signatures, the electoral body decided to cancel the entire presidential recall, this caused a huge discontent among the population. This excuse to cancel the presidential recall was already an obvious attempt from the electoral body to protect Nicolas Maduro

The parliament annuls the designation of judges to the Supreme Court

Because they were illegaly named, the opposition-held parliament decided in June of 2016 to annul the designation of the 13 judges who were named back in December of 2015.

3 deputies who were sworn in, were taken out

Beginning in 2017, in its first ordinary session, the parliament, then chaired by Julio Borges, deputy for the opposition coalition, officially disbanded the 3 challenged deputies, fulfilling the condition of the Supreme Court to exit contempt. However, the Supreme Court did not withdraw the contempt alleging that the old directive presided by Henri Ramos Allup is the one who must do the formalities

Supreme Court granted legislative powers to Nicolas Maduro

In March 27 of 2017, the Supreme Court granted legislative powers to Nicolas Maduro, however, they quickly clarified the judgement by issuing a clarification where the judges supressed to grant legislative powers to both the Supreme Court and Nicolas Maduro

Nicolas Maduro calls for a constituent assembly, to create a new constitution

On May 1, 2017, Nicolas Maduro, issued a decree to convene a National Constituent Assembly (ANC) based on a controversial interpretation of articles 347, 348 and 349 of the Constitution. This call again ignited the alarms of Venezuelan society, as many jurists point out that Maduro has violated the Constitution by usurping the functions of the sovereign people when calling a Constituent Assembly, when this power corresponds strictly to the People of Venezuela as a whole and not to people in particular. A Constituent Assembly is a supranational body, all-powerful institution that can change from the education curriculum to remove any officials of any branch of the government, including the president of the republic, reform or derogate the criminal code.
It would not be the first time a constituent assembly would be convened. Back in 1998 Chavez did the same, but first he called for a consultative referendum to decided whether the people agreed to convene elections to elect constituent deputies. If the results of the consultative referendum were against the election of constituent deputies then there won't be any constituent assembly at all. Nicolas Maduro didn't allow the people the chance to vote in a consultative referendum to decide whether we wanted a constituent assembly or not. He just directly call for elections to elect constituent deputies implying there will be a constituent assembly.
This move to call for a constituent assembly was seen as parallel national assembly.

"Maduro is the people"

On June 7, 2017, the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme Court handed down judgment 378, which determined that the president was authorized to convene a constituent without a prior consultative referendum, since he acted in the name of the sovereignty of the people. Article 5 of the Constitution establishes that the sovereignity "resides intransferably among the people." People argue that Maduro himself can't act in the name of the entire population for these matters.

Attorney General filed a contentious electoral appeal agains the constituent assembly

On June 8, the Attorney General, Luisa Ortega Díaz, filed to the Supreme Court a contentious electoral appeal and precautionary relief for all purposes of the constituent assembly and, invoking Article 333 of the Constitution, invited all Venezuelans to join the appeal in order to stop the constituent assembly and preserve the validity of the current Constitution. The next day the vicinity of the Supreme Court was closed by State security forces preventing citizens from adhering to the appeal filed by the attorney general

Illegal appoinment of 13 judges elected in 2015 was contested by the attorney general

On July 2, 2017, the attorney general challenged the appointment of the 13 principal judges and 21 substitutes after it was known that in the process of appointing these judges, the Republic Moral Council (formed by the Citizen's Branch which includes the attorney general, the ombudsman, and comptroller) did not hold an extraordinary session to evaluate the scales of application, as established in Article 74 of the LOTSJ (Organic Law of the Suprme Court), but they sent the files of the candidates and then presented the minutes to sign it, which she refused to do so because the session had not been held. The next day, the ombudsman presented a document with the alleged signature of the attorney general alleging that she had signed the act. María José Marcano, former secretary of the Republic Moral Council accused the ombudsman of lying and presenting a forged document, because neither she nor the attorney general had signed the act as it was an act performed illegally due to political pressures

Attorney general was dismissed by the Supreme Court

At petition of a socialist parliament member, the Supreme Court dismissed the attorney general and granted its powers to the ombudsman that are exclusive of the Public Ministry

Opposition-held parliament appoints 13 new judges to the Supreme Court

Once the attorney general contested the election of the 13 judges to the Suprme Court illegaly appointed in december of 2015 by deputies of the socialist party, on July 21 of 2017 the opposition-held parliament decided to follow the procediment fulfill the necessity to appoint new judges to the Supreme Court. This time, every aspect of the process was fulfilled. Days later, Maduro started to jail these judges, however, many could flee the country before being kidnapped.
However, they are functioning as the legitime Supreme Court since it was named by the opposition-held parliament.

Elections to the constituent assembly take place on July 30

The only candidates were members of the socialist party because the electoral bases were designed to avoid any other person not affiliated to the party to be candidate. Only socialist party members could be candidate to the constituent assembly.
The election was denounce by most western countries, including Canada, the EU, Australia, among others.

Constituent assembly calls for presidential election

On January 23, 2018, the constituent assembly decreed that the presidential election scheduled for late 2018, should be held before April 30. Several countries in America and Europe have expressed their disavowal of the results due to the impediment of opposition parties participation and the lack of time for the lapses established in the electoral regulations.
Two days later, on January 25, the Supreme Court ordered the electoral body to exclude from these elections the ballot of the Democratic Unity Table (opposition coalition), arguing that within that coalition there are parties that have not complied with the validation process of political parties established in the law.

Presidential election took place on May 20, 2018

The only candidates were Nicolas Maduro, ex chavista Henri Falcón, and the evangelical pastor Javier Bertucci. Maduro obtained 68% of the votes. Henri Falcon didn't recognize the results, as did many countries around the world and the rest of the opposition parties.
The election was rigged as electoral observers including the Carter Certer condemned the election.
The parliament rejected the election.

Supreme Court in exile annul presidential election

On July of 2018, the Supreme Court that was named by the opposition-held parliament issued a decree to nullify the presidential election, ordering the parliament to name an interim president. Source

Christian Zerpa defects and flees to the US

On January 8, 2019, Christian Zerpa, one of the 13 judges named illegaly in 2015 by socialist parliament members, who also accepted the petition to outlaw opposition-held parliament, defected and fled to the United States, this being motivated by disagreeing with the swearing in of Nicolás Maduro for a second presidential term. Zerpa made a series of statements that questioned the independence of powers and the transparency of Venezuelan justice.
He confessed that he was appointed as a judge in the express process of 2015, because he had always been loyal to Chavez.

Maduro swore in to the presidency

After the presidential election that took place in May 20 of 2018, Maduro swore in to the presidency on January 10 of 2019. This must be done in the parliament but this time he did it in the Supreme Court.

Legislative year ended, new body president is approved

Juan Guaidó was elected president of the legislative branch on January 5 of 2019

Presidential term ended in January 10 of 2019 without an elected president of the republic

The parliament, after rejecting the election back then in May of 2018 and following the judgement issued on July of 2018 by the Supreme Court in exile, stated that there is not an elected president of the republic.
The powers of the executive branch must be transferred to the president of the legislative branch.

Juan Guaidó assumes executive powers, swore in in January 23 of 2019

As an interim president, he must call for elections in the next 30 days, however, there may be some inconvenients about having elections right now. Therefore, he called for a transitory government.

FAQ

What happened to the 13 judges named by the opposition-held parliament, and to the attorney general Luisa Ortega?

The new Supreme Court is fulfilling his duties in another country, as they're recognize by the OAS and the US.
Luisa Ortega now is exiled. She was replaced by the William Saab who was the ombudsman at the time she fled the country. The vice-ombudsman became the ombudsman.

Was the 2018 presidential election legitime?

The body who must convene the election must be the electoral body. For the 2018 presidential elections, the constituent assembly was the one who called for presidential election. If you don't recognize the constituent assembly, then you don't recognize neither the election it convened for.

Why we don't recognize the constituent assembly?

Because we didn't had a consultative referendum to decide whether we wanted a constituent assembly or not.

Why did the opposition parties boycott the election to elect constituent deputies?

The electoral bases for the election of constituent deputies, that took place in june 30 of 2017, were rigged. Only socialist party members were allowed to be candidate. The opposition parties were not allowed to have candidates. They don't even boycotted the election, they couldn't even be candidates.

Is Venezuela a socialist country?

Yes, it is.

70% of the Venezuela's economy is privately owned?

No, it isn't. In order to be on privately owned you first need private property rights. That's to say, if you own something, you then can put prices to products and even distribute/sell or buy whatever amount you want. That is not the case for Venezuela as most of its economy is actually collectively owned, based on socialist principles.
You can't put prices to products, and you get exprorpriated if you produce basic goods, for example. You can't sell them for profit.
submitted by callado to vzla [link] [comments]

How to dive deep into political theory and philosophy: The Big List

This is a list of (largely) contemporary thinkers, books and video content aimed as a reference for questions like -
"What should I read next?", "Who should I follow?" or "What are the best resources for [certain political topic]?"
The core list comes from Chomsky, and the books and people he's cited or praised. But the list has significantly expanded since then. Feel free to comment about any good books or channels you think should be on this list.
Chomsky discord server:
https://discord.gg/ynn9rHE
Journalists
Start off with:
Adam H Johnson - Propaganda Model, Media Critique at FAIR
Nathan J Robinson - Journalist, Current Affairs
Glenn Greenwald- Journalist, Privacy, US imperialism. The Intercept
Also Great
Owen Jones- UK Journalist
Naomi Klein- Journalist, neoliberalism, globalization.
George Monbiot- Journalist, environmentalist.
Amy Goodman- Journalist Democracy Now
Alex Press - Journalist and Founder, Jacobin
Alexander Cockburn - Journalist
Chris Hedges- Journalist.
P Sainath- Journalist, India specialist
Whistleblowing:
Daniel Ellsberg- Vietnam, Released Pentagon Papers.
Edward Snowden
Chelsea Manning
Julian Assange
US History and Foreign Policy
Start off with:
Noam Chomsky - Everything
Howard Zinn- Historian
Laura Poitras - Documentary maker
Also Great
Eqbal Ahmad, - US imperialism
Michelle Alexander, US prison system
William Blum- Former State Dept. Agent, Historian, US imperialism
Jean Bricmont- “The Belgian Chomsky” – US imperialism, geopolitics,
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz - US History
Thomas Ferguson- US elections specialist.
Ian Haney Lopez- Racism, US politics.
Deepa Kumar- US imperialism, Islamophobia.
Andrew Bacevich - U.S. foreign policy, historian
Economics
Start off with:
Thomas Piketty - inequality
Ha-Joon Chang - institutional economist, specialising in development economics:
Joseph Stiglitz - Former World Bank Chief Economist
Amartya Sen- Third world development and Inequality, Nobel Prize Winner
Yanis Varoufakis
Richard Wolff- Marxism
Dean Baker
Also Great
Michael Albert
John Bellamy Foster
Richard Wilkinson- inequality
William Krehm - Labour
Stephanie Kelton - Modern Monetary Theory
Historians
Start off with:
Thomas Frank - historian, American politics
Howard Zinn- "People's" Historian
Raul Hilberg - The Leading Authority on the Holocaust
Phillip Mirowski - History of economics
Eric Hobsbawm - historian, Marxist
Also Great
Gar Aleprovitz, - world war 2, co-operatives.
Alex Carey - Laid the foundation for Manufacturing Consent
Nancy Maclean - US South, Labor, Race
Mark Curtis
Mike Davis- Globalization, Historian.
Gerald Horne- Historian, black liberation.
Gabriel Kolko- Historian. World War 2.
Morris Berman - historian, American social critic
Israel/Palestine
Start off with:
Norman Finkelstein- Israel specialist.
Avi Shlaim - Israel
Also Great
Amira Hass- Journalist, Israel specialist.
Illan Pappe- Israel specialist
James Petras- Israel and Latin America specialist.
Greg Philo- Media criticism, Israel.
Media Criticism
Start off with:
Edward Herman- Media criticism.
Robert McChesney- media criticism.
Edward Said- sociology, Islamophobia, Israel, media criticism
Also Great
Ben Bagdikian, - media criticism.
Keane Bhatt- Media Criticism, Latin America.
Oliver Boyd-Barrett- Media Criticism
Sut Jhally- sociology, film-maker
James Curran- Media Criticism
Alan MacLeod - Media Criticism, Venezuela
Anarchism/Socialism/Political Theory
Start off with:
David Graeber- historian, anarchism, Occupy Wall Street, anthropology.
Joel Bakan, - writer of “The Corporation”, seminal book on corporations.
Cornel West- sociology
Tariq Ali, “The British Chomsky”- everything from globalization to history to politics.
Murray Bookchin - Anarchism
Also Great
Angela Davis- Feminism, Marxism, black liberation.
Peter Gelderloos - anarchism
Uri Gordon - anarchism, Israel/Palestine
Harry Cleaver - Marxism, economics
Michel Bauwens - P2P, political economy
James C. Scott - anarchism, anthropology
Michael Heinrich - Marxism, political science
Specialists
Stephen Cohen- Russia specialist.
Bruce Cummings- Korea Specialist.
Aviva Chomsky – Immigration, Latin America.
Eduardo Galeano- Poet, Author, Latin American specialist.
Fawaz Gerges - Middle East specialist.
Andrej Grubacic- Yugoslavia specialist.
Flynt and Hillary Leverett- Iran specialists.
William I. Robinson- globalization, neoliberalism, Latin America specialist
Lars Schoultz- Latin America specialist
Sanho Tree- drugs, Colombia specialist
Nick Turse - Africa
Mark Weisbrot- economics, Latin America
Kevin Young- media criticism, Latin America
Raj Patel- Food
Vijay Prashad- globalization, third world development
Thomas Szasz- Criticism of psychiatry
Alfie Kohn- Education.
Daniel Kovalik - Human rights
Paulo Freire- Education.
Henry Giroux- Education
Greg Grandin - Historian, Latin America
Dave Zirin- sports
Gabor Maté- Education, drugs, psychiatry.
Kate Bronfenbrenner - Labour and Unions
Loic Wacquant - sociology, neoliberalism
Bernard Harcourt - surveillance, penal law
Eric Toussaint - political science, debt
The best arguments for major mainstream political positions:
Fascism and Neo-Conservatism
On Dictatorship and The Concept of The Political Carl Schmitt
Note:
Some have argued that neoconservativism has been influenced by Schmitt Most notably the legal opinions offered by Alberto Gonzales, John Yoo et al. by invoking the unitary executive theory to justify highly controversial policies in the war on terror—such as introducing unlawful combatant status which purportedly would eliminate protection by the Geneva Conventions torture, NSA electronic surveillance program—mimic his writings.Professor David Luban said in 2011 that "[a] Lexis search reveals five law review references to Schmitt between 1980 and 1990; 114 between 1990 and 2000; and 420 since 2000, with almost twice as many in the last five years as the previous five"
Realpolitik
World Order, by Henry Kissinger
Liberalism/Social Democracy
A Theory of Justice, by John Rawls
Right-Wing Libertarianism
Anarchy, State, Utopia by Robert Nozick
Technocracy
Zero to One, by Peter Thiel
Marxism-Leninism
Left-Wing Communism, and Infantile Disorder by Vladimir Lenin
Recommended books:
Israel/Palestine and the Middle East:
Start off with:
The Iron Wall by Avi Shlaim
★ Gaza: An Inquest Into Its Martyrdom by Norman Finkelstein
Also Great
★ Fateful Triangle by Noam Chomsky
Israel/Palestine: How to End the War of 1948 by Tanya Reinhart
The Birth of Israel: Myths and Realities by Simha Flapan
Between the Lines: Israel, the Palestinians, and the U.S. War on Terror by Tikva Honig-Parnass
The Holocaust Industry: Norman Finkelstein
Defending the Holy Land: A Critical Analysis of Israel's Security and Foreign Policy by Zeev Maoz
Gaza: An Inquest Into Its Martyrdom by Norman Finkelstein
The New Intifada: Resisting Israel’s Apartheid by Roane Carey, Alison Weir, and others
The Battle for Justice in Palestine by Ali Abunimah
American Foreign Policy:
Start off with:
★ ★ ★ Understanding Power by Noam Chomsky
Killing Hope: U.S. Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II by William Blum
Also Great:
Defeat: Why America and Britain Lost Iraq by Jonathon Steele
A Different Kind of War: The Un Sanctions Regime in Iraq by Hans. C. Von Sponeck
Al-Qaeda: Casting a Shadow of Terror by Jason Burke
How America Gets Away with Murder: Illegal Wars, Collateral Damage and Crimes Against Humanity by Michael Mandel
The Deaths of Others: The Fate of Civilians in America's Wars by John Turnam
Talking to the Enemy: Faith, Brotherhood, and the (Un)Making of Terrorists by Scott Atran
The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade by Alfred W. McCoy
Ideal Illusions: How the U.S. Government Co-opted Human Rights by James Peck
War Stars: The Superweapon and the American Imagination by Howard Bruce Franklin
Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan by Nick Turse
Tomorrow's Battlefield : U.S. Proxy Wars and Secret Ops in Africa by Nick Turse
The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II by John Dower
Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety by Eric Schlosser
The Hungry World: America's Cold War Battle Against Poverty in Asia by Nick Cullather
Voices From the Other Side: An Oral History of Terrorism Against Cuba by Keith Bolender
The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner by Daniel Ellsberg
Tinderbox: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Roots of Terrorism by Stephen Zunes
One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War by Michael Dobbs
Kill Chain: Drones and The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins by Andrew Cockburn
First Do No Harm: Humanitarian Intervention and the Destruction of Yugoslavia by David Gibbs
The Management of Savagery by Max Blumenthal
Media and Propaganda:
Start off with:
Manufacturing Consent by Edward Herman and Noam Chomsky
Propaganda by Edward Bernays
The Record of the Paper: How the New York Times Misreports US Foreign Policy by Richard A. Falk
Also Great:
The Real Terror Network: Terrorism in Fact and Propaganda by Edward Herman
The Politics of Genocide by Edward Herman
Taking the Risk Out of Democracy: Corporate Propaganda versus Freedom and Liberty by Alex Carey
American History and Culture:
Start off with:
★ A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn
Also Great:
Political Repression in Modern America: FROM 1870 TO 1976 by Robert Justin Goldstein
No is Not Enough: Resisting Trump's Shock Politics and Winning the World We Need by Naomi Klein
The Industrial Worker, 1840-1860: The Reaction of American Industrial Society to the Advance of the Industrial Revolution by Norman Ware
Voices of a People's History of the United States by Anthony Arnove and Howard Zinn
Violent Politics: A History of Insurgency, Terrorism, and Guerrilla War, from the American Revolution to Iraq by William R. Polk
★ With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful by Glenn Greenwald
Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right by Arlie Russell Hochschild
The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward Baptist
The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II by Douglas A. Blackmon
Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945 by Max Hastings
The Politics of War: Allied Diplomacy and the World Crisis of 1943-1945 by Gabriel Kolko Labor History:
The Fall of the House of Labor by David Montgomery
Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945-60 by Elizabeth A. Fones-Wolf
The Market Revolution: Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 by Charles Grier Sellers
Sociopathic Society: A People’s Sociology of the United States by Charles Derber
On the Rojava Experiment:
Revolution in Rojava
Struggles for Autonomy in Kurdistan
A Small Key Can Open a Large Door
Rojava: An Alternative to Imperialism, Nationalism, and Islamism in the Middle East
Coming Down the Mountains
To Dare Imagining: Rojava Revolution
★ Ocalan’s Prison Writings
Anarchism, Socialism, Philosophy, and Science:
Start off with:
Government In The Future(Talk) by Noam Chomsky
Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell
On Anarchism by Mikhail Bakunin
The Limits of State Action by Wilhelm von Humboldt
Also Great
Progress Without People: In Defense of Luddism by David F. Noble
Granny Made Me an Anarchist: General Franco, The Angry Brigade and Me by Stuart Christie
Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals' Abuse of Science by Alan Sokal
Beyond the Hoax: Science, Philosophy and Culture by Alan Sokal
A Theory of Power by Jeff Vail
Workers' Councils by Anton Pannekoek
The State: Its Origin and Function by William Paul
On Anarchism by Noam Chomsky
The Anarchist Collectives: Workers' Self-Management in the Spanish Revolution 1936-39 by Sam Dolgoff
Anarchism by Daniel Guerin
The Ancestors Tale by Richard Dawkins
Demon Haunted World by Carl Sagan
Memory and the Computational Brain: Why Cognitive Science WIll Transform Neuroscience by Randy Gallistel and Adam Philip King
Vision: A Computational Investigation Into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information by David Marr
Economics:
Start off with:
★ ★ Bad Samaritans: The Myth of Free Trade and the Secret History of Capitalism by Ha-Joon Chang
★ Making Globalization Work by Joseph Stiglitz
Capital in the 21st Century by Thomas Piketty
Adam Smith and His Legacy for Modern Capitalism by Patricia H. Werhane
Also Great:
Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism by Richard Wolff
Das Kapital by Karl Marx
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America by Martin Gilens
America Beyond Capitalism by Gar Alperovitz
The ABCs of Political Economy: A Modern Approach by Robert Hahnel
★ ★ Golden Rule: The Investment Theory of Party Competition and the Logic of Money-Driven Political Systems by Thomas Ferguson
The Conservative Nanny State: How the Wealthy Use the Government to Stay Rich and Get Richer by Dean Baker
Rigged: How Globalization and the Rules of the Modern Economy Were Structured to Make the Rich Richer by Dean Baker
Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age by Larry M. Bartels
Understanding Capitalism: Critical Analysis From Karl Marx to Amartya Sen by Douglas Down
Whose Crisis, Whose Future?: Towards a Greener, Fairer, Richer World by Susan George
Business as Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism by Paul Mattock Jr.
Greening the Global Economy by Robert Pollin
Capitalism: A Ghost Story by Arundhati Roy
Political Economy and Laissez Faire by Rajani Kannepalli Kanth
The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time by Karl Polanyi
Miscellaneous:
★ Discipline and Punish, by Michel Foucault
Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs by Johann Hari
Controlling the Dangerous Classes by Randall G. Shelden
Pedagogy of the Opressed by Paulo Freire
The Verso Book of Dissent: From Spartacus to the Shoe-Thrower of Baghdad by Andrew Hsiao
Don't Mourn, Balkanize!: Essays After Yugoslavia by Andrej Grubačić
★ Field Notes on Democracy: Listening to Grasshoppers by Arundhati Roy
Voices from the Plain of Jars: Life under an Air War by Fred Branfman
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
In Praise of Barbarians by Mike Davis
Damming the Flood by Peter Hallward
Hope and Folly: The United States and UNESCO, 1945-1985 by Edward Herman and Herbert Schiller
Fanshen: A Documentary of Revolution in a Chinese Village by William Hinton
The Egyptians: A Radical Story by Jack Shenker
Welcome to the Revolution: Universalizing Resistance for Social Justice and Democracy in Perilous Times by Charles Derber
Sociopathic Society: A People’s Sociology of the United States by Charles Derber
The Black Jacobins by C.L.R. James
Dark Money by Jane Meyers
King Leopold's Ghost by Adam Hochschild
Recommended YouTubers/Creators/Channels(with a linked video to get you started):
Political
Contrapoints | America: Still Racist
★ Philosophy Tube | The Philosophy of Antifa
Existential Comics
★ ★ Chomsky’s Philosophy | Bakunin's Predictions
HBomber Guy | Soy Boys: A Measured Response
Shaun | How Privatisation Fails: Railways
Badmouse Productions | Argument ad Venezuelum
Three Arrows | Who is actually at fault for the refugee crisis?
Gravesend Films (with Norman Finkelstein) | The Idea Of Utopia
The Intercept | Greenwald and Risen debate Russiagate
Non Political
Lindsay Ellis - Film Criticism | The Ideology of the First Order
The Great War - History | The Run For The Baku Oil Fields
History Civilis - History | The Constitution Of The Spartans
Numberphile - Mathematics | Perplexing Paperclips
Computerphile - Technology | The Bitcoin Power Problem
Vihart - Mathematics | Hexaflexagons
3Blue1Brown - Mathematics | How Cryptocurrencies Work
PBS SpaceTime - Astronomy, Physics | The Blackhole Information Paradox
Will Schoder - Video Essays | The Problem with Irony and Postmodernism
Assorted Documentaries to get you started:
Manufacturing Consent - The seminal work on how the population is controlled in democratic societies
★ ★ Citizenfour - Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras in a Hong Kong Room.
★ ★ Risk - A deep look at Wikileaks - from the inside the embassy.
The Murder of Fred Hampton - How the FBI brazenly assassinated an American citizen without any warrant or due process
Weiner - An incredible look at how political campaigns function from the inside.
The Corporation - What are corporations?
The Shock Doctrine - Lectures by Naomi Klein, news-reel footage and analysis to explain the connection between politics and economics.
Hypernormalization - Explains not only why chaotic events happen - but also why we, and politicians, cannot understand them.
Inside Job - A look at the cause for the financial crisis
Podcasts
Start off with:
★ ★ ★ Citations Needed
Also Great:
Intercepted
Current Affairs Podcast
Chapo Trap House
Moderate Rebels
Economic Update
Protect Yourself:
PrivacyToolsIO,
Electronic Frontier Foundation
submitted by -_-_-_-otalp-_-_-_- to chomsky [link] [comments]

Buying bitcoin will end the protests in Uzbekistan, Hong Kong, Iraq, Iran, and Bolivia!

No, buying bitcoin won't stop the protests and make the governments of those countries cave to the will of their own people. Get out of your pipe dream.
Now then, Bitcoin can be a tool to help traffic funds to and from the people in those countries, but let me break down the arguments piece by piece:
-Hong Kong protests: Zero relation to economy. All related to human rights. Buying bitcoin doesn't blanket fix this. -Uzbekistan: Overselling oil to Russia and China, not enough oil for their own citizens. Buying bitcoin doesn't blanket fix this. -Iraq: Political corruption, inadequate basic utilities for the masses (running water and electricity). Buying bitcoin doesn't blanket fix this. -Iran: Hiking oil prices for their citizens, making subsidence in daily life nearly impossible. Buying bitcoin doesn't blanket fix this. -Bolivia: Political corruption, rigged elections. Buying bitcoin does not blanket fix this.
While I get the enthusiasm for the internet of money that can be sent anywhere to anyone without restrictions and then converted to cash one way or another, you have to use your head. Bloodshed does not help bitcoin. people buying and using bitcoin is good for bitcoin.
Now then, there are methods that bitcoin can be used to circumvent some situations, like HSBC seizing 8 million USD in aid for Hong Kong protestors. Directly sending them bitcoin could help, absolutely, but trying to tell everyone on this sub, "Buying bitcoin will end the protests" is a load of horse shit. People trying to send this message to everyone on reddit are "journalists" who bought some 4 USD monthly domain on godaddy.com or a similar website.
That is all.
EDIT Reason: added a new paragraph, added some new content.
submitted by sgtslaughterTV to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Delegated Proof Of Stake

While there are a number of consensus algorithms that most functional cryptocurrency platforms have adopted over the years, a couple of these algorithms have become more popular than the others.
While the proof of work (PoW) algorithm has been identified to be the very first consensus mechanism integrated into a crypto platform, the proof of stake (PoS) and the delegated proof of stake (DPoS) are two other mechanisms that have been designed as an alternative to PoW. The first move advantage PoW had in the market has not withstood criticism and adjustments to optimize the protocol.
Generally, the PoW system requires users to make use of advanced mining rigs and hardware which will require large computational power. The PoS and the DPoS algorithms unlike PoW requires fewer resources and by design happens to be more eco-friendly and sustainable.
For us to get an idea of how the delegated proof of stake works, it is only right that we have a knowledge of what the PoW and the PoS consensus mechanisms are and how they function.
Proof Of Work
This is the first consensus algorithm to be integrated into a blockchain network. It was used as a way to ensure that the majority of the users on the Bitcoin network did not take total control of the network. It was used on the Bitcoin network to validate transactions and for users to validate these transactions, they have to make use of advanced and expensive hardware mining rigs.
With the high expenses associated with the PoW mining model, many people are restricted from entering the mining pools with any form of efficiency. Thus, power can become concentrated on a PoW network, one of the main concerns for users of the original networks operating with PoW.
This consensus algorithm will require users to solve complex mathematical problems if they are to compete and validate transactions on the network. These mathematical puzzles have been made to be as difficult as possible. This is to ensure that miners do not easily find these blocks.
Proof Of Stake
This consensus algorithm was designed to be an alternative to proof of work and the restrictions the PoW model put on user’s ability to be miners. Proof of Stake was discovered in 2012 after most platform developers sought for alternative consensus algorithms that can be used. Unlike the PoW, the proof of stake algorithm requires that miners on the network stake or have their coins locked.
To explain better, for miners who want to mine on the network, they will have to stake a certain amount of coins if they are to successfully mine. This simply means that if a miner owns about 5% of the total coins on a network, then that user would then have the right to mine 5% of all transactions that are carried out on the network. Thus, creating an incentive for users to hold coins instead of the incentive many miners had in the proof of work model to sell their coins to the market quickly after mining them or in more malicious cases, try to attack a weaker proof of work network with a 51% attack.
Delegated Proof Of Stake
The Delegated Proof of Stake (DPoS) algorithm was launched in 2014 by Daniel Larimer, a more renown developer within the world of cryptocurrency. He helped pioneer this new model of validation for blockchain technologies. Today, there are a number of crypto platforms that make use of this consensus algorithm and they include Steem, Ark, Bitshares, Lisk, and many other networks today.
DPoS based blockchain networks work in a voting manner where stakeholders on the network will have to outsource their duties to third-parties. It can be said that these stakeholders are able to vote for a few people to help them manage the security of the network. On any of the DPoS based crypto networks, these individuals that are voted to maintain the security of the network for others are referred to as delegates, while those voted to validate transactions on these networks are called "witnesses".
A closer look at this consensus algorithm will point to a resemblance to the PoS algorithms. For example, on any of the DPoS based algorithms, the vote count and worth of each of the users will be determined by the number of coins they have in their possession. While the voting system may vary from one blockchain network to another, one thing is certain - each of the delegates or individuals to be voted for will have to present to others on the network a proposal of what they will accomplish when voted in as either delegates or witnesses. Most of the time, the rewards that are gotten from the validation of blocks by these witnesses are shared proportionally with the various electors. This is just like the PoS except that there is no voting system and that each user will have to represent himself.
DPoS based blockchain networks have their voting systems based on the reputation of the delegate in question. Unlike the traditional voting system, on these blockchain networks, if witnesses do not carry out their duty of validating blocks on the network, they will be expelled and immediately replaced by another. This helps to secure the network from malicious actors. Furthermore, these DPoS based networks adapt which makes them more scalable than the PoW and the PoS algorithms. This is because they elect a few people who do the job for the network.
Characteristics Of The Delegated Proof Of Stake Algorithm
While we have discussed what the DPoS consensus algorithm is, it is best that we discuss some of the features or characteristics that set it apart from both the PoS and the PoW. These underlying characteristics apply to the Delegated Proof of Stake algorithm as well. These characteristics include;
  1. A Voting System - Unlike the other two consensus algorithms, the DPoS algorithm has a voting system. On these networks, users will have to vote for delegates or witnesses that will validate transactions on the network. The votes are weighted according to the number of coins that an individual on the network has. While users do not need to have so many coins to become delegates, they need to have voters that have more coins as their votes can help make them become top tier witnesses.
  2. System Witnesses - These are those that are chosen by users on the network to validate transactions on their behalf. Depending on each of these networks, the number of witnesses may vary. While these witnesses can block transactions that are being sent, they cannot in any way alter or change the information on each of these transactions. This is because the blockchain technology is immutable.
  3. NetworkDelegates - This happens to be another set of people on the DPoS based blockchain networks. They are voted by users on the network to help maintain the network. They are elected to oversee the overall performance as well as the entire blockchain protocol. These delegates can propose things on the network. For example, they can propose that the number of witnesses is reduced or increased and users on the network will have to vote either for or against the motion.
As always, the team here at Affil Coin is happy to help where we can. So, if you ever have any questions, stop by the Affil Coin Telegram chat and talk to a member of our team! Furthermore, if you want to learn more about Delegated Proof of Stake, click here and visit the Affil Coin site!
submitted by affilcoin to affilcoin [link] [comments]

Hackers break into voting machines within 2 hours at Defcon

Hackers break into voting machines within 2 hours at Defcon submitted by Scientist34again to WayOfTheBern [link] [comments]

The man who rigged America's election maps - YouTube It's Rigged  The Truth About US Elections ▶️️ Roy Moore Election Was Rigged - Court Involved ! Rigged Election 100% PROOF The 2020 Election WILL Be Rigged #YangGang

Fast forward to November 2013, one year on from his re-election, and Bitcoin had surged by 2,221% to hit $253. However, it would be foolish to suggest that Obama had anything to do with this. ‍ President Donald Trump's arrival in 2016 was much more interesting. When the result was first confirmed, Bitcoin shot up by 3.8% — from $709 to $736. Back then, the short-term surge was linked to ... Bitcoin Only Matters Because the Game Is Rigged. Bitcoin Only Matters Because the Game Is Rigged. TRENDING. 1. New Jersey AG files suit accusing student loan giant Navient of 'unconscionable ... Bitcoin is a vote against the established financial market. And no matter what happens in November, the established financial markets are going to … Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts. Log in sign up. User account menu • BTC is going up with the election, no matter the results. Close • Posted by 1 hour ago. BTC is going up with ... Rigged Election: Twitter Bans 150,000 Trump Accounts, Citing QAnon, “Threat of Harm” Andrew Anglin July 22, 2020. Twitter’s official “Twitter Safety” account on Tuesday announced the mass banning of accounts allegedly associated with QAnon, claiming that they are a threat to “safety.” The official account claimed that these accounts had “potential to lead to offline harm” and ... The election is an important, commercial property. It’s an expensive show, a major entertainment venue -- for the hoi-polloi -- designed to funnel off their money, attention, emotional energy, spirit and time. The voters do not determine the outcome of the election, which is thoroughly rigged, well in advance, but they do pay for it, very ...

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The man who rigged America's election maps - YouTube

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